Irish Songs Lyrics With Guitar Chords By Martin Dardis

Arthur McBride Lyrics Chords

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Arthur McBride lyrics and chords Christy Moore and Planxty
Traditional. This one goes back to 1840s and was recorded by Planxty , Paul Brady and Bob Dylan. The first verion is by Andy Irvine with Plankty. all the other versions of the song are included here. The sheet music is below. thanks to Marc Fahrbach for the chords for the planxty version.

[D]I had a first cousin called Arthur McBride
he and[G] I took a[D] stroll down[Em] by the sea[G]side
a[D] seeking good fortune and what might the[Bm] tide
it was[D] just as the[Em] day was a[G] dawn[A]ing

And[D] after we rested we[G] went on a[D] tramp
we[G] met Seargeant[D] Napper and [Em]Corporal [G]Cramp
and a[D little wee drummer who[Bm] beat up our camp
with his[A] rowdy dou[G] dou in the mor[D]ning

He said my young fellows if you will enlist
a guinea you quickly shall have in your fist
and besides a crown for to kick up the dust
and drink the King's health in the morning
but had we been such fools as to take the advance
the wee bit of money we'd have to run chance
do you think it no scuples for to send us to France
where we would be killed in the morning

He says my young fellows if I hear but one word
instantly now will out with my sword
and into your bodies as strength might afford
so now me gay devils take warning
but Arthur and I we soon took the odds
and we gave them no chance for to draw out their swords
our wacking shillelaghs came over their heads
and paid them right smart in the morning

As for the wee drummer we rifled his pouch
and we made a football of his rowdy dou dou
and into the ocean for to rock and to roll and
barring the day its returning
as for the ould rapier that hung by his side
we flung as far as we could in the tide
To the divil I pitch you says Arthur McBride
to temper your edge in the morning.

ARTHUR McBRIDE 3/4    

 Short Version in C (use Capo on 5th fret for Planxty-video)

 

I (C)had a first cousin called Arthur McBride,

He and (F)I took a (C)stroll down (Dm)by the sea(F)side

A-(C)seeking good fortune and (F)what might be(C)tide,

T'was just as the (Dm)day was a-(F)daw(G)ning

And then (C)after resting we (F)both took a (C)tramp,

We (F)met seargent (C)Harper and (Dm)corporal (F)Cramp

Be(C)sides the wee drummer who beat up for camp

With his rowdy-dow-(G)dow in the (C)morning

 

He says 'My young fellows, if you will enlist,

a Guinee you quickly will have in your fist

Besides a Crown for to kick up the dust

And drink the King's health in the morning'

Had we been such fools as to take the advance

The wee bit of money we’d have to run chance

‚Do ye think it no sruples for to send us to France

Where we would be killed in the morning ‚’

 

He says 'My young fellows, if I hear but one word,

I instantly now will out with my sword

And into your bodies as strength will afford,

So now, my gay devils, take warning'

But Arthur and I we took in the odds,

We gave them no chance to launge out their swords

Our whacking shillelaghs came over their heads

And paid them right smart in the morning

 

As for the young drummer we rifled his pouch

And we made a football of his rowdy-dow-dow

And into the ocean to rock and to roll

And bade it a tedious returning

As for the old rapier that hung by his side

We flung it as far as we could in the tide

To the devil I pit you, says Arthur McBride

To temper your steel in the morning

 
 
 

Long Version in G

 

I (G)had a first cousin called Arthur McBride

He and (C)I took a (G)stroll down (Am)by the sea(C)side;

(G)Seeking good fortune and (C)what might be(G)tide

It was just as the (Am)day was a'(C)daw(D)nin'

And (G)after restin' we (C)both took a (G)tramp

We (C)met Sergeant (G)Harper and (Am)Corporal (C)Cramp

Be(G)sides the wee drummer who beat up the camp

With his row-dee-(D)dow-dow in the (G)morning

 

He says my young fellows if you will enlist

A guinea you quickly will have in your fist

Besides a crown for to kick up the dust

And drink the King's health in the morning

For a soldier he leads a very fine life

He always is blessed with a charming young wife

And he pays all his debts without sorrow or strife

And always lives happy and charming

 

And a soldier he always is decent and clean

In the finest of garments he's constantly seen

While other poor fellows go dirty and mean

And sup on thin gruel in the morning

Says Arthur, I wouldn't be proud of your clothes

You've only the lend of them as I suppose

And you dare not change them one night or you know

If you do you'll be flogged in the morning

 

And although we are single and free

We take great delight in our own company

And we have no desire strange countries to see

Although your offer is charming

And we have no desire to take your advance

All hazards and danger we barter on chance

and you'd have no scruples to send us to France

Where we would be shot without warning

 

And now says the sergeant, if I hear but one word

I'll instantly now will out with my sword

And into your bodies as strength will afford

So now my gay devils take warning

But Arthur and I we took the odds

We gave them no chance to launch out their swords

Whacking shillelaghs came over their heads

And paid them right smart in the morning

 

As for the wee drummer, we rifled his pow

And made a football of his row-do-dow-dow

Into the ocean to rock and to roll

And bade it a tedious returnin'

As for the old rapier that hung by his side

We flung it as far as we could in the tide

To the Devil I pitch you, says Arthur McBride

To temper your steel in the morning

 

Version
                                    2

ARTHUR MCBRIDE
G                                        
Me and me cousin, one Arthur McBride,
      C      G           Am         C
As we went a'walkin down by the seaside
   G                       C        G   
we met Sergeant Harper and Corporal Pride,
              Am        C  D
The day being Christmas mornin'
      G                         C            G     
"Good mornin, good mornin'" the Sergeant did cry,
                                Am     C
"And 
The same to ye gentlemen", we did reply
  G                                         
Intending no harm, we just meant to pass by
              D            G
The day being pleasant and charming

Says he, "my young fellows if you will enlist
It's 10 guineas in gold I will slip in your fist
I'll throw in a crown for to kick up the dust
And drink the king's health in the morning.
For a soldier he leads a very fine life
And he always is blessed with a charming young wife
While other poor fellows have sorrow and strife
And sup on thin gruel in the mornin'"

Says Arthur, "I wouldn't be proud of yer clothes
for you only lend out them, now as I suppose
And dare not change them one might if ye dare
For you know you'd be flogged in the mornin'
And we have no desire to take yer advance
For all of the dangers we'd not take the chance
And you'd have no scruples and send us to France
Where you know we'd be shot in the mornin'"

 

"Oh, no" says the Sergeant, "if I hear one more word
I quickly right now will draw out me sword
And into your bodies as strength will afford
So now, me young devils, take warning".
But Arthur and I we counted the odds
And we scarce give them chance for to launch out their blades
With our trusty shillelaghs we bashed in their heads
And paid them right smart in the morning.

And the rusty old rapiers that hung by their sides
We flung them as far as we could in the tide
"Now take that, ye devils," cried Arthur McBride
"And temper your steel in the morning".
And the little young drummer, we flattened his pouch
And we made a football of his rowdy-dow-dow
Kicked it into the ocean for to rock and to roll
And bade it a devious returning.

Oh, Me and me cousin, one Arthur McBride,
As we went a walkin down by the seaside
A-seeking good fortune and what might betide,
It being on Christmas mornin'

 

Arthur McBride Sheet Music
Arthur McBride Sheet Music

Arthur McBride lyrics chords tab

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